How to connect sql server database in ASP.NET Core MVC

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.Net Core: Set SQL Server Connection String in AppSettings.json

Net Core developer looking to set up your SQL Server connection string in AppSettings.json? Look no further! In this blog post, we will explore two methods that will help you achieve this seamlessly. Whether you prefer the standard location or a custom appsettings structure with sections, we’ve got you covered. Plus, we’ll show you how to access the Configuration object in both Startup.cs and ASP.

Net MVC controller. So let’s dive right in and discover how easy it is to configure your SQL Server connection string using .

Net Core!

Method 1: Using the standard location

Simple layered architecture of Asp.Net Mvc core.

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Method 1: Using the standard location

One of the simplest ways to set your SQL Server connection string in AppSettings.json is by utilizing the standard location. In a typical .

Net Core project, you will find an appsettings.json file already created for you. This file acts as a centralized configuration source for your application.

To get started, open the appsettings.json file and locate the “ConnectionStrings” section. Within this section, you can define your SQL Server connection string using key-value pairs. For example:

“ConnectionStrings”: {
“DefaultConnection”: “Server=localhost;Database=mydatabase;User Id=myuser;Password=mypassword;”
}

Here, “DefaultConnection” is used as the key to reference this specific connection string throughout your application.

appsettings

Once you have defined your connection string in AppSettings.json, it’s time to access it within your code. But how do we do that? Let’s find out!

Method 2: Using a custom appsettings structure with sections

Method 2: Using a custom appsettings structure with sections

In addition to the standard location for the connection string in AppSettings.json, you can also configure a custom structure using sections. This allows for greater flexibility and organization when managing multiple connection strings or other configuration settings.

To set up a custom appsettings structure with sections, first create a new section within the AppSettings.json file. For example, you might have a section called “ConnectionStrings” that contains all the different connection strings your application needs.

Within this section, you can then add individual properties for each connection string. Each property should have a unique name and its corresponding value should be the actual connection string.

By organizing your appsettings in this way, it becomes easier to manage and update your connection strings as they are logically grouped together. It also makes it simpler to retrieve specific connections strings when needed.

To access these custom sections in your code, you will need to use the Configuration object provided by .

NET Core. This object gives you access to all of your application’s configuration settings including those within custom sections like ConnectionStrings.

Using a custom appsettings structure with sections provides an efficient method for configuring SQL Server Connection Strings in .

NET Core applications. It offers improved organization and flexibility while still being easy to access and manage through the Configuration object.

Accessing the Configuration object

Accessing the Configuration object in .

NET Core is essential for retrieving settings and values from the appsettings.json file. This powerful feature allows developers to easily manage and update application configurations without modifying code.

To access the Configuration object, you can use it in various parts of your application, such as Startup.cs and ASP.

NET MVC controllers. In Startup.cs, you can inject IConfiguration as a parameter in the constructor or directly access it using the built-in configuration property.

Once you have access to the Configuration object, you can retrieve values using its Get method by specifying the key or path to the desired setting.

In an ASP.

NET MVC controller, accessing the Configuration object follows a similar approach. You can either inject IConfiguration directly into your controller’s constructor or use dependency injection through services.

By leveraging this capability provided by .

NET Core, developers gain flexibility in managing connection strings and other configurations within their applications. This makes it easier to switch between different environments or databases without making changes to source code.

Accessing the Configuration object offers great convenience when working with app settings in .

NET Core applications. It simplifies management of configuration values while maintaining separation of concerns between code and configuration data.

Access configuration in Startup.cs

Accessing the configuration object in the Startup.cs file is a crucial step when setting up your SQL Server connection string in .

Net Core. This allows you to retrieve values from the appsettings.json file and use them throughout your application.

To access the configuration object, you first need to inject it into the constructor of your Startup class. You can do this by adding an IConfiguration parameter like so:

public Startup(IConfiguration configuration)
{
Configuration = configuration;
}

Once you have injected the IConfiguration object, you can then access its values using dot notation. For example, if your connection string is stored under a section called “ConnectionStrings” with a key of “DefaultConnection”, you can access it like this:

string connectionString = Configuration.
GetConnectionString(“DefaultConnection”);

You can then use this connection string to configure your database context or any other component that requires it.

Remember to always keep security in mind when accessing sensitive information such as connection strings. It’s important to properly protect and encrypt these values to prevent unauthorized access.

By accessing the configuration object in your Startup.cs file, you ensure that your SQL Server connection string is easily accessible and secure within your .

Net Core application.

Access configuration in ASP.

Net MVC controller

H3: Access configuration in ASP.

Net MVC controller

In addition to accessing the configuration object in the Startup.cs file, you can also access it within your ASP.

Net MVC controllers. This allows you to retrieve the SQL Server connection string and use it wherever necessary within your application.

To do this, you will need to inject an instance of the IConfiguration interface into your controller’s constructor. This can be done using dependency injection.

Once you have injected the IConfiguration interface, you can access the SQL Server connection string by calling its GetConnectionString method and passing in the name of your connection string as defined in the appsettings.json file.

Here’s an example of how this can be done:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
private readonly IConfiguration _configuration;
public HomeController(IConfiguration configuration)
{
_configuration = configuration;
}
public IActionResult Index()
{
var connectionString = _configuration.
GetConnectionString(“SqlServerConnection”);
return View();
}
}

By following these steps, you can easily retrieve and utilize your SQL Server connection string within your ASP.

Net MVC controllers. This allows for seamless integration with a database and ensures that sensitive information such as passwords are securely stored outside of code files.

Setting up a SQL Server Connection String in AppSettings.json is a straightforward process in .

Net Core. By utilizing either of these methods – standard location or custom appsettings structure with sections – along with accessing the Configuration object appropriately, developers can easily manage their database connections while keeping sensitive information secure.

 

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